Sunday, June 24, 2018
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Return to the Father's Heart
So the Earth Will Survive
Robert B. Scott

Return to the Father’s Heart

This crucial book will pave the way for the of coming Elijah of Malachi 4:5-6, who is prophesied to bring today’s absent fathers toward their neglected or jettisoned children and bring the heart of believers back to their Father in heaven. The book offers a solution to a pervasive problem among men today: their inability to forgive abusive fathers. This modern-day Elijah will “restore all things” (Mat. 17:11), including the true gospel of the Kingdom or Family of God, revealing the dangerous error of the grace revolution leading to the appearance of the man of lawlessness, an evil leader who will fight the second coming of Jesus. Click HERE to order your copy today!

 

 

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Confession of Sin Pastor Robert Scott

Confession of sin is a principle expressed throughout the Bible. Today, October 22, 2015, Joseph Prince stated on his TV program once again that confession of sin in First John 1:9-10 was a verse meant for Jews who had adopted a certain Gnostic heresy, whereas chapter 2 explained that we were already forgiven in any case. While Prince said he does confess sin, the implication was that it wasn’t really necessary.

In fact, that is the only conclusion you can draw since they say the law is done away. The law defines sin, so without law, no sin exists. So why even bother to confess it? And why twist the Scriptures to say that First John 1:9-10 doesn’t apply to believers? Jesus told us clearly to live by every Word of God, not to explain away an important principle taught throughout the Bible, which is confession of sin.

Believers still miss the mark and sin, so we must confess those sins to God. David, a man after God’s own heart, prayed, “And see if there be any hurtful way in me, and lead in the everlasting way” (Ps. 139:24). Sin hurts us, and David wanted to know every sin in his life so he could confess and forsake it, as he did in Psalm 32. David sought perfection. Jesus attained that perfection, never sinning, to show us what we should seek after as we follow His example. Our goal is to seek to become perfect like our Father.

While God is merciful, He expects us to see and lay aside the “sin which so easily entangles us” (Heb. 12:1). He tells us to confess our sins to others, so of course He wants us to confess them to Him (James 5:16). Acknowledging sin is a part of forsaking it. If we can’t see it, we can’t abandon it either. Confessing it to God is a necessary part of repentance of sin. It’s a basic concept that has become fuzzy because of this insistence that God’s law is done away, since lawlessness is biblically defined as sin. No law equals no sin.

So why even argue that First John’s command to confess sin is not valid? It’s only invalid if there is no law to define sin. So why not be un front and admit that you don’t need to confess sin because there is indeed no sin with no law?

There is no need to bring in a convoluted explanation of that verse that is false. The Bible is either all good for believers, or it isn’t. This verse is a command to practice what is practiced throughout the Bible, which is to confess sin. It applies to every believer. Nothing in First John 1 implies anything different.

The more you compromise with the Word, the more you will have to compromise as a little leavens the whole lump (1 Cor. 5:6).

 

 


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